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  • IMG_6712a-200x300Cecylia Plater- Zyberk Schools is a complex of private, female and male schools, consisting of elementary school, middle school and high school, named after its founder. The school is housed in a beautiful tenement in Warsaw’s city center. It was founded in 1883, coinciding with the wave of positivism when women attempted to gain equal rights to education. It is the only Catholic all-girl and boys school run by laypersons, teaching in the spirit of respect for different religions and cultures.
    Starting as Women’s Crafts Centre, the school soon transformed into general education school with its first graduation in 1917, which was when women were first allowed to take their A-levels. In the interwar period the school was thriving (one of the best educational institutions in Poland), already after the death of its founder. Between 1939 and 1944 it was officially reduced to primary school, however still provided education for higher grades secretly. In 1950 it was closed down under pressure from the communist regime. The school building became state-owned. Until 1990, Towarzystwo Oświatowe (Platerki Association) used to worked unofficially.
    Cecylia Plater- Zyberk School was reactivated in 1993 thanks to the efforts of Platerki Association which consisted mainly of the school’s graduates. Since then it has been providing education for girls and boys, teaching continuously grades from the primary through high school until A – levels. In 2008 it was registered as a Catholic school.

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    Cecylia Plater- Zyberk Schools
    Preschool
    Primary School
    Middle School

    Piękna 24/26
    00-549 Warsaw – Warszawa
    Phone: + 48 22 621 52 54
    E-mail: sekretariat@cpz.edu.pl
    Secretary’s office open hours:
    8:00 am – 4:00 pm

    Principle
    Anna Stępińska-Szarek
    a.szarek@cpz.edu.pl

  • Dr. Gail Gross on learning differences between boys and girls:

    Neuroscience tells us that yes: boys and girls are different. Boys’ brains are larger, but girls’ brains grow faster and typically their interests and learning styles vary somewhat.

    New studies tell us that it is the environment that we create for our children that has the greatest impact on the way they learn and what they learn. Many boys pick up less social cues than their female counterparts. Girls make more serotonin and oxytocin, so they are calmer and more interested in emotional connection.

    Boys mature more slowly than girls and girls have more of their cerebral cortex defined for verbal function. The hippocampus, where memory and language live, does develop more rapidly and is larger in girls than in boys. This impacts vocabulary, reading and writing skills. Boys, on the other hand, have more of their cerebral cortex defined for spatial relationships because of this boys learn easily through movement and visual experience. Also, because girls have more serotonin and oxytocin, girls can sit for longer periods of time, whereas boys who may need movement to feel comfortable. When little boys don’t want to make eye contact and they fidget in their seats, and little girls are caught talking and sending notes, a savvy teacher can organize her classroom in which she takes into consideration that little boys need to move around, and little girls need to express themselves verbally, and interprets this as part of their biology rather than misbehavior. A savvy parent can be sure that there are playtime opportunities during the day for both boys and girls to unwind and express themselves in a creative way. Further, allowing children to start school especially little boys a little later, perhaps even by a year, gives them an edge. A more mature child can handle school material in a much better way.

    So what can we do to help boys and girls have a happy, fulfilling, well-rounded, and successful school career?

    • Be certain that your child’s school has a recess program that includes unstructured playtime.
    • Be careful to not label children, especially with labels such as ADD and ADHD, unless they are diagnosed by a health care professional. Many boys and some girls are just on the outer edge of active and are being mislabeled.
    • Encourage girls to play with toys and activities that allow them to use their spatial relationship and manipulation skills.
    • Encourage boys to take study breaks and allow your son to be active during those study breaks.
    • Help your daughter talk through her feelings about schoolwork and school problems. Because girls may focus on communication, relationships and attention for approval, they can easily get caught up in an intense emotional experience. Often a girl will subvert her own feelings, including needs, to get the approval of others and this causes self-esteem issues.
    • Engage your daughter in sports to help her build confidence.
    • Help your son with literacy skills, including reading, writing, journaling, drawing, creativity, fantasy, humor, war and mythology. Boys are action-oriented, often competitive and impulsive risk-takers, so giving them an opportunity to express themselves creatively and explore their interests is very important. This will help connect their words to their feelings and validate both.
    • Offer your daughter the opportunity to experience STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics) using everyday examples. By having access to a computer, girls can build, design, and explore anything from architecture, medicine, engineering to culinary experiences. You can also enroll your daughter in one of the many STEM programs around the country.
    •  Make sure teachers understand the different learning styles of boys and girls so that they are able to create a learning environment that meets the needs of both, by teaching different modalities that capture girls’ needs for spatial learning practice, including geometry, and boys’ needs for enrichment projects.

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